Wintry walks

Grab your walking boots, bundle up and get walking. A wander around the woods during winter is a dreamlike experience, unlike any other. Take in the bare, frost-covered branches and enjoy the quiet stillness that only comes when there’s a chill in the air.

red squirrel in the snow

Credit: iStockPhoto.com / Dgwildlife

Wildlife

Winter is the perfect time to spot wildlife, as the trees are bare and there isn’t much greenery around. Plus, woods are particularly still during the wintertime, so it’s much easier to see spot any flurries of activity from birds, squirrels and other wildlife.

Photography

Capture the magic you can only experience in wintry woodland by taking your camera along. It’s a great opportunity to capture some brilliant images, from dazzling sunsets and picturesque carpets of snow to frost-covered fallen leaves.

Read our woodland photography tips.

mistletoe close-up

Credit: Robertharding / Alamy Stock Photo

Winter flora

While many of the plants you see in woodland are absent during the winter months, there is still lots of flora to be seen. Primroses and snowdrops make an appearance, and weird and wonderful fungi and lichens flourish. Mistletoe, holly and ivy are another welcome sight during this chilly time of year.

Lend a helping hand 

Give back to nature when you visit the woods by lending woodland wildlife a helping hand. Kids will love building a den out of sticks and fallen leaves for animals to shelter from the wintry weather, or a bug hotel out of logs and fallen branches.

Get inspiration from Nature Detectives.

snow drop with blurry background

Credit: Phil Formby / WTML

Signs of spring

Despite it being winter, signs of spring are already beginning to show. Take a close look among tree branches and beneath leaf litter and you might find anything from bugs to buds, snowdrops to frog spawn. If you do spot any spring signs, let us know by sending in your pictures. You'll be playing an important part in tracking the effects of climate change and weather on wildlife.

Be part of Nature's Calendar.

Our winter blogs: