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When to cut grass after winter

Whether you love or hate maintaining your lawn, mowing is normally needed between March and October. If the weather has been particularly mild you might find yourself doing it all winter. You shouldn’t cut your lawn if the soil is soft or if there is a frost (or one due within 24 hours), as mowing under either of these conditions will damage turf and compact soil. Other factors that affect growing in the spring include your location in the UK and how much shade your lawn is subject to.

When to cut grass

Nature’s Calendar recorders have been documenting lawn first cut since 2000. The average date for lawn first cut year on year usually falls in March or early April. Volunteers also report if they have had to cut their lawn all winter.

These results indicate that on average you will probably need to start cutting your grass at some point during March.

First cut grass 2017

The earliest report of cut grass in 2017 was received on 4 January. If we have a particularly mild winter we may see early reports again in 2018.

Why is the date of first cut grass important?

Grass is one of the earliest plants to start growing in spring, and one of the last to stop growing in the winter. Knowing whether grass is still growing or not tells us a lot about the length of the growing season. The Met Office has estimated that the growing season has increased by at least a month and grass is growing all year round in some areas. This is an important indicator of the effects of climate change. If this is grass’ response, what impact is climate change having on other species?

Knowing when grass is growing tells us a lot about the length of the growing season (Photo: Adam Burton/WTML)
Knowing when grass is growing tells us a lot about the length of the growing season (Photo: Adam Burton/WTML)

Tell us when you’ve cut yours

Join the 1029 people who reported when they first cut their lawn in 2017 on the Nature’s Calendar website. Your data will be invaluable in allowing scientists to study the effects of climate change on UK wildlife.

Contribute to studies on the impact of climate change on UK wildlife.

Put your records on the map

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