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Let’s plant more havens for wildlife

The fortunes of some of our best loved wildlife are changing for the better thanks to hard work by conservationists. Ospreys, purple emperors and pine martens are all on the rise. But that’s only half the story. Lots of our nation’s wildlife, including mammals, birds, bats and insects, remain in serious trouble. With your help, there’s still time to save them.

Help us write the next chapter for UK wildlife

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The good news

Ospreys flying high

After years of persecution, the UK had lost all its breeding osprey pairs by 1916. Remarkably, they returned by natural recolonisation in 1954.

Ospreys are flying high again after years of conservation work (Photo: North East Wildlife Photography)
Ospreys are flying high again after years of conservation work (Photo: North East Wildlife Photography)

Now thanks to decades of work reintroducing this magnificent bird and protecting its habitat, we have more than 300 breeding pairs. They include Louis and Aila, who successfully raised their first chick at Loch Arkaig in 2017, watched worldwide by thousands on our live ospreycam.

 

Chick Lachlan tries to help his first-time parents, Louis and Aila, with some housekeeping in 2017 (Video: WTML)

Butterflies spreading their wings

The purple emperor is one of the rarest and largest butterflies in the UK. Loss of important ancient woodland habitat caused the population to decline, but now it’s found in more places than 10 years ago. This unmistakeable species can now be found at five of our woods in the South of England, including Tring Park, Cadora Woods and Piddington Wood.

The purple emperor is expanding its kingdom again (Photo: Peter Eeles)
The purple emperor is expanding its kingdom again (Photo: Peter Eeles)

Pine marten revival

Once the second most common carnivore in Britain, these days the pine marten is one of the rarest.

But together with other conservationists we’re battling to preserve this threatened species - and numbers are on the rise again.

Following decades of research, 51 pine martens have been carefully moved from healthy populations in Scotland to Welsh forests, where they are breeding successfully.

This iconic woodland species was once common in the UK. Though this is no longer the case, there is hope for its future (Photo: Anne Marie Kalus/Flickr)
This iconic woodland species was once common in the UK. Though this is no longer the case, there is hope for its future (Photo: Anne Marie Kalus/Flickr)

The bad news

Our wildlife is in trouble

Not all species are enjoying the same comeback as the pine marten, purple emperor and osprey. Many, many more are vulnerable, including hedgehogs, dormice, red squirrels, stag beetles, barbastelle bats and nightingales.

A key factor in their decline is habitat loss and destruction. Without the food and shelter provided by woods, trees and other habitats, our wildlife is struggling. Many species are facing a crisis and desperately need our help. Don’t let this be the end of their story.

The hazel dormouse is fascinating but increasingly rare - it has already disappeared from much of the UK (Photo: Arco Images GmBH/Alamy)
The hazel dormouse is fascinating but increasingly rare - it has already disappeared from much of the UK (Photo: Arco Images GmBH/Alamy)

Help us write the next chapter

As the UK’s largest woodland conservation charity, we’re working hard to reverse the decline.

We’re out there right now creating a brighter future for the wildlife we all love, one tree at a time. But we all need to step up and get more trees in the ground as soon as possible.

Planting millions of trees each year creates vital sanctuaries for wildlife. New woodland matures to become the habitat of the future, giving wildlife space to thrive.

Our members are crucial in supporting our work to plant trees. With their help, we were able to plant 1.7 million native trees last year.

We’re making all the difference we can. But we need to do more.

Become a member today. Together we can plant the trees vital to our own wellbeing and create even more havens for wildlife.

Help us write the next chapter for UK wildlife

Become a member