Tree Charter launched in Scotland

The new Charter for Trees, Woods and People had its Scottish launch on Saturday at Lang Craigs near Dumbarton. It was one of those chilly but clear days when it is fabulous to be out in the woods – so long as you have the thermals on!

Left to right: Mandy Haggith read the poem which will be carved on our Charter Pole. Carol Evans and Councillor McLaren planted an oak tree to mark Charter launch and woodland fun with the tree fairies of Rowanbank. (Photo: WTML / George Anderson)
Left to right: Mandy Haggith read the poem which will be carved on our Charter Pole. Carol Evans and Councillor McLaren planted an oak tree to mark Charter launch and woodland fun with the tree fairies of Rowanbank. (Photo: WTML / George Anderson)

Charter for Trees, Woods and People

Show your support by signing the Charter

The Charter’s ambition is to place trees and woods at the centre of national decision making, and back at the heart of our lives and communities.

Following involvement from over 70 organisations, more than 100,000 members of the public and at least 300 community groups the document’s 10 guiding principles redefine the relationship people in the UK have with trees and woods. 

Woodland Trust Scotland Director Carol Evans planted an oak tree with Councillor Iain McLaren, Convener of Infrastructure, Regeneration & Economic Development for West Dunbartonshire Council.

Councillor McLaren said: “It is a great honour for me, on behalf of West Dunbartonshire Council, and indeed everyone who loves woods and trees across Scotland, to celebrate this Charter here with you today.”

A West Dunbartonshire woodland neighbouring Lang Craigs will be the location for one of ten huge hand carved oak poles being installed across the UK. Each pole will represent one of the charter principles. The Scottish pole’s theme is combatting threats, and it will be carved with a poem by Mandy Haggith.

Mandy read her poem at Saturday’s celebration:

Resilience
Forest crests, connected,
curl and rake.
Yet, even in the wildest gale,
rarely break.
Waves of life, protected,
resist the worst attack,
hold fast through every ebb,
always flooding back.

Following the formal part of proceedings children and families enjoyed a story-telling walk through the woods with the fairy folk of Rowanbank Environmental Arts.

The chilly day was rounded off with hot soup and sandwiches in Overtoun House, before everyone willow-weaved their own Christmas wreath to take home.

Find out more about the Charter for Trees, Woods and People.

Everyone made their own Christmas wreaths. (Photo: WTML / George Anderson)
Everyone made their own Christmas wreaths. (Photo: WTML / George Anderson)

Charter for Trees, Woods and People

Show your support by signing the Charter